ISRO Chief Says Chandrayaan-3 to Attempt Safe Landing on Moon This Year

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Last Updated: January 05, 2023, 10:07 IST

Chandrayaan-2 took off in July 2019. Though the rocket lifted seamlessly from Sriharikota, it met with sudden failure after Lander Vikram crashed on the lunar surface minutes before the scheduled landing. (News18)

Chandrayaan-2 took off in July 2019. Though the rocket lifted seamlessly from Sriharikota, it met with sudden failure after Lander Vikram crashed on the lunar floor minutes earlier than the scheduled touchdown. (News18)

While the moon mission is ready for this 12 months, Gaganyaan might take extra years as ISRO is creating and testing applied sciences to guarantee the security of astronauts who will go into area for the primary time

All preparations are in place for India’s third mission to the moon. And, this time round, the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) is leaving no stone unturned to guarantee its spacecraft Chandrayaan-Three makes a profitable soft-landing on the lunar floor for the primary time ever.

“Everything is set. The satellite is fully integrated,” stated ISRO chief S Somanath as he talked concerning the mission that has been within the making for nearly 4 years now.

ISRO’s expectations and targets for Chandrayaan-Three are the identical as that of its earlier mission — it’s going to look to obtain what the company couldn’t with Chandrayaan-2 which took off in July 2019. Though the rocket lifted seamlessly from Sriharikota, it met with sudden failure after Lander Vikram crashed on the lunar floor minutes earlier than the scheduled touchdown.

Second Shot At Moon Landing

A profitable try would have introduced India right into a choose membership of countries which have already achieved the feat — the US, Russia and China.

“We lost the Lander last time. So the Rover also could not come out of it to do all the experiments aboard — put probes into the soil and collect all sorts of data. This time, the main target is to do that final task successfully — make a safe landing on the moon so the rest of the process can proceed as planned,” stated the senior scientist on the ongoing 108th Indian Science Congress.

From bringing in modifications within the propulsion system in addition to the software program to including new sensors aboard, ISRO is leaving nothing to probability this time round. “The lander has been rigorised to handle multiple failures in case there is any once the rocket takes off. We have tried to fix every unexpected problem, every process which in our mind could go wrong, including any algorithm issues that might occur. Now it is almost ready,” stated the ISRO chairman.

The company is assured of launching the much-awaited mission this 12 months. With all preparations in place, it’s now wanting to finalise an appropriate launch window, which normally falls in June-July. “All the necessary tests have been completed. We just need to select the best days, depending on the capability of the rocket,” said Somanath. ISRO has already readied its heaviest launcher GSLV Mk III for the launch.

Wait for Gaganyaan Might Get Longer

While Chandrayaan-3 is set for 2023, the scientists are also focussing on realising yet another big space dream — Gaganyaan. The launch of India’s first human spaceflight has been facing constant delays. The launch initially planned for 2022 has now been pushed to post-2024.

However, the ISRO chief said the mission is daunting and it could take more time than expected. “It is nothing like sending a satellite into space. We cannot take chances with human beings. So, we are going cautiously and carefully. It usually takes a long time, over 10 years, to develop human spaceflights capability. We did it in four years,” he added.

Four Test Abort Missions, First In 2023

As many as four test abort missions have been planned to test all necessary operations before the final manned mission in 2024. The first unmanned flight is set for this year, two in 2024, and the final one a year after. These rockets will lift off to a certain height and test the systems which are critical to help the crew escape in case of any unexpected failure. If all goes right, ISRO will go ahead with its final mission.

But it could still take more years, added the ISRO chief.

“Primarily because our industrial ecosystem of manufacturing has not matured to a level where it can support us. One of the most important technologies is the Environment Control life support system for the crew. We wanted to procure it from outside — Russia or Europe — and build it but it was not easily available and came at an exorbitant cost. So we decided to build it in-house and that may take time,” he added. ​

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