Where is Hindutva in Indian politics?

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Renowned historian and parliamentarian Dr. Radha Kumud Mukherjee gave a speech on the 51st birthday of Shri Guruji in Nagpur, the Hindi translation of which was published in the March 19, 1956 issue of Panchjanya. In his speech, he praised the successful leadership and Sangh works of Shri Guruji.

Many eminent litterateurs and historians of the country have also been making Panchjanya prosperous with their writings. In this sequence, an article on the development of the party system in India titled ‘Political Parties of India and Hindutva’ was published in the issue of November 11, 1957. It was written by Dr. Ishwari Prasad, former chairman of the Department of Politics in Prayag University. In this, while mentioning the flaws of the party system, he described them as anti-democracy. Dr. Ishwari Prasad writes, ‘This system has enslaved the human mind and stopped the individual from taking decisions according to his own intellect.

Party forums neither explain nor explain. They present attraction and give rise to delusions. Power is concentrated in the hands of a few groups because of parties.’ His article is in reference to the book ‘Party Politics in India’ published by Princeton University Press and authored by Professor Myron Wiener. In this, Wiener had described Jana Sangh, Hindu Mahasabha, Rashtriya Sangh and Ram Rajya Parishad as ‘communal’, while not even mentioning the Muslim League. Criticizing this, Dr. Prasad has clarified that the parties expressing faith in Hindutva cannot be communal, because 33 koti before them is the goal of serving the Hindu society.

Even though they have become an integral part of the vast Indian society, these converted Muslims have proved to be more religiously fanatical than the foreign Muslims settled in India. Firoz Shah Tughlaq and Sikandar Lodi were born to Hindu mothers, but they proved to be more fanatical Muslims than any other Sultan of Dali.

In another issue, Professor of History of Agra University, Dr. Adarsh ​​Lal Srivastava, in his article titled “Indianization of Muslims: A Complex Problem”, has written that it is a crime to include Muslims also about the demand for Indian Karana or history. Mandatory call? If seen through the prism of votary, characterless politics, it will probably be a crime, but if seen from the point of view of history, which gives a vision of truth by penetrating politics, then the demand for Indianization of Muslims is not only necessary but the most complex problem. In this he wrote, citing the example of England and Germany, how Catholics kept the British for 100 years (from the 16th-17th centuries) suspecting that they were more loyal to the Pope of Rome and more often to Spain and Portugal than to their homeland. .

Similarly, in the 19th century, the German Chancellor Bismarck was forced to resort to a policy of repression towards German Roman Catholics, who also suffered from a disease of divided loyalty between church and state. Similarly, it is a big headache for an enlightened Indian Muslim to relate his religious allegiance with patriotism. Although it is historically true that the ancestors of 90 percent of the Muslims of India were Hindus first. But this alone cannot accept his allegiance to the country and walk away. Even though they have become an integral part of the vast Indian society, these converted Muslims have proved to be more religiously fanatical than the foreign Muslims settled in India. Firoz Shah Tughlaq and Sikandar Lodi were born to Hindu mothers, but they proved to be more fanatical Muslims than any other Sultan of Dali. Religion and the Quran do not allow Muslims to believe in non-Muslims and have social relations with them. Apart from this, Muslims are more loyal to Darul Islam than to the country. Even though the caliphate came to an end, the Indian Muslims continued to consider themselves the subjects of the dead caliph.

Similarly, in an issue, historian Dr. Yadunath Sarkar writes in an article published under the title “The Challenge of History to India” that the downfall of a nation which does not learn from the past is inevitable. He has compared them with the history of Italy, giving a clear and bold discussion of moral and many other problems and in the end suggested that the only way to save the country from the present mismanagement is the creation of an organized army of selfless social workers.

Renowned historian and parliamentarian Dr. Radha Kumud Mukherjee gave a statement on the 51st birthday of Shri Guruji in Nagpur, the Hindi translation of which was published in the issue of Panchjanya on March 19, 1956. In his speech, he praised the successful leadership and Sangh works of Shri Guruji.

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