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Turkey’s President Warns Sweden on NATO After Koran Burning

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Turkey’s President Warns Sweden on NATO After Koran Burning

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Last Updated: January 23, 2023, 23:07 IST

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan has been the president of Turkey for 10 years and served as prime minister for another eleven between 2003 and 2014 (Image: Reuters)

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan has been the president of Turkey for 10 years and served as prime minister for one more eleven between 2003 and 2014 (Image: Reuters)

Sweden mustn’t count on assist from us for NATO,” Erdogan said in his first official response to the incident

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan warned Sweden on Monday that it should not expect his backing to join NATO following the burning of the Koran outside Ankara’s embassy in Stockholm.

Erdogan’s furious comments further distanced the prospects of Sweden and Finland joining the Western defence alliance before Turkey’s presidential and parliamentary polls in May.

Turkey and Hungary are the only NATO members not to have ratified the Nordic neighbours’ historic decision to break their tradition of military non-alignment in response to Russia’s invasion of Ukraine.

Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban has promised that his parliament would approve the two bids next month.

But Erdogan has dug in his heels heading into a close election in which he is trying to energise his nationalist electoral base.

“Sweden should not expect support from us for NATO,” Erdogan stated in his first official response to the act by an anti-Islam politician throughout a protest on Saturday that was accredited by the Swedish police regardless of Turkey’s objections.

“It is evident that those that brought on such a shame in entrance of our nation’s embassy can now not count on any benevolence from us concerning their utility for NATO membership,” Erdogan said.

Swedish leaders roundly condemned far-right politician Rasmus Paludan’s actions but defended their country’s broad definition of free speech.

Erdogan has already set out a series of tough conditions that include a demand for Sweden to extradite dozens of mostly Kurdish suspects that Ankara either accuses of “terrorism” or of involvement in a failed 2016 coup.

Sweden’s courtship of Turkey seemed to be making headway with a flurry of visits by high ministers to Ankara.

Stockholm has additionally enacted a constitutional modification that may make it potential to cross more durable anti-terror legal guidelines demanded by Ankara.

But issues turned bitter when a small Kurdish group hung an effigy of Erdogan exterior Stockholm’s metropolis corridor earlier this month.

Turkey summoned the Swedish ambassador and revoked an invite for its parliament speaker to go to Ankara.

The Swedish police resolution to approve Paludan’s protests drew the same response.

Turkey summoned Stockholm’s ambassador for one more dressing down and cancelled a deliberate go to by Sweden’s defence minister.

Erdogan stated the burning of the Muslim holy e book was a hate crime that might not be defended by free speech.

“No one has the best to humiliate the saints,” he said in nationally televised remarks.

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(This story has not been edited by News18 workers and is revealed from a syndicated information company feed)

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